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Josh deLacy lives in Seattle, Washington, where he climbs cliffs, summits mountains, and builds websites. NPR called him a modern-day Jack Kerouac after he hitchhiked 7,000 miles across the United States, and a few dozen surprised drivers told him he didn’t smell bad. Since that experience, he found homes in the Pacific Northwest, the Episcopal Church, and Calvin College’s the post calvin. Josh deLacy’s writing has appeared in places such as The Emerson Review, Front Porch Review, and Perspectives. His website: joshdelacy.com.

Writing

 

Fiction

 

Creative nonfiction

 

Web content

Website

Development

Design

Maintenance

Writing

Fiction

Creative nonfiction

Web content

Josh deLacy is a writer and website developer from Seattle, Washington. He left the Pacific Northwest to study writing in Michigan and England, intern in Washington D.C., and graduate from Calvin College with a double major in writing and political science. He spent a summer hitchhiking across the country before returning to Washington where he now climbs cliffs, summits mountains, and writes.

Website Development

I build custom WordPress-based websites for small businesses, non-profits, and artists. Each website is designed specifically for my client’s needs. I can create an entirely new website (complete with written content), or I can remodel an existing website. I equip every site with traffic monitoring and security measures, and I can provide basic training in how to use and maintain your new website.

Traveling on Trust

 

Main photoDuring the summer of 2013, I hitchhiked 6,700 miles across small-town America, carrying nothing but a backpack, an almost-empty wallet, and a sign that read Traveling On Trust.

I hitchhiked along cowpath highways and dime-sized towns, testing the hope that people will stop to help a stranger. I slept with a shotgun one night, rode fifty miles with a blind driver, and found myself trapped with a man who once attacked police officers with a machete—but despite a few nervous moments, I found good people. These Good Samaritans were truckers and criminals, meth addicts and Vietnam draft dodgers, New Age skiers and conservative Christians. Their diversity challenged my definition of what it means to be a good person, and my attempts to understand them came at the cost of my own convictions about right and wrong.

I kept a blog as I traveled, where I shared a few of the more significant stories that happened along the way. And The Spark, Calvin College’s alumni magazine, published a six-page feature about my story in the winter of 2013. Since that summer, I’ve written a full-length travel memoir called Traveling on Trust about the experience, and I’m in the middle of that long process of finding the ideal literary agent.

My Blogs

the post calvin

the post calvin

We are thirty Calvin alumni writers under thirty years old. Take a glimpse into our lives, our thoughts, and our writing. thepostcalvin.com

Traveling On Trust

Traveling On Trust

I am hitchhiking across America in search of stories, with (1) no money, (2) no interstates, and (3) no asking for help. travelingontrust.com